Photo Overview and Photographers

DANCING FOR FREEDOM
Hadil Freihat, Berlin, Germany, 2021

This picture is taken in the east side gallery, the longest preserved piece of the Berlin Wall. This Gallery stands both as a symbol of joy over the end of Germany’s division and as a historical reminder of the inhumanity of the GDR border regime. For me, this art piece is a living proof that transformation is an inevitable part of life: As a resemblance of change possibilities, the dance over separation towards freedom.


HAPPY CREW
Gudrun Kramer, Lisbon, Portugal 2015

I found this graffiti in Lisbon near one of the funiculars, that make this city very special. For me, the image itself with its pastel colours spreads already happiness and I like to think about the ASPR team as “Happy Crew”.


MAKE ART, NOT WAR
Julia Scharinger at Arte Moris, Dili, Timor-Leste, 2011

A picture taken in the Timorese Art School „Arte Moris“, which was the first Fine Arts School, Cultural Center and Artists‘ Association established in 2003 after Timor-Leste gained its independence in 1999. Back then the founders of this non-profit school – Swiss artists Gabriela and Luca Gansser – had the vision of working especially with young folks in Timor and tapping into the potential of art for psychosocial reconstruction and healing. Today the school is led by Timorese artists and a vibrant hub for a variety of creative processes and engagemnets.

This picture depicts one of the student’s practice of visual art-making in public spaces.


WE ARE STILL RULED BY HOPE
Rayana Shadoud, Aleppo, Syria 2020

During the Syrian Civil War, Aleppo has served as battleground, with tragic consequences for their inhabitants. In 2010, Aleppo had 4.6 million inhabitants but the number of people decreased to 2.3, as a result of death, displacement, violence, destruction, and the collapse of basic services. The exact location of the photo is Al-Faisal street beside Al-Taalouf hospital, which has been assigned to accommodate and treat COVID-19 patients, and the meaning of the writing on the wall is: Despite the war mixed with the pandemic, we are still ruled by hope. The artist belongs to the local youth and lives in that neighbourhood. His name is Mouhammed Shalaty.


SUN WITH PEACE
Gudrun Kramer, Lagos, Portugal 2016


I LIVE TO GIVE SOMETHING THAT WILL LIVE ON
Julia Scharinger at Arte Moris, Dili, Timor-Leste, 2011

A picture taken in the Timorese Art School „Arte Moris“, which was the first Fine Arts School, Cultural Center and Artists‘ Association established in 2003 after Timor-Leste gained its independence in 1999. Back then the founders of this non-profit school – Swiss artists Gabriela and Luca Gansser – had the vision of working especially with young folks in Timor and tapping into the potential of art for psychosocial reconstruction and healing. Today, Arte Moris is led by Timorese artists and has brought forth widely recognised artists, such as Etson Caminha, Tony Amaral and Alfeo Romeo. They and many of their peers have become a critical, generative and visionary voice for their country and people, often advocating for peace and justice through their art.


THIS IS MY ANNOUNCEMENT
Anisa Goshi, Beirut, Lebanon 2020


METE
Julia Scharinger, Dili, Timor-Leste, 2011

This mural was created in 2006/7 as part of a campaign for peace to respond to the civil unrest of that time and strenghten the sense of unity amongst the Timorese population. During my visit in 2011 it was also the home of families who had lost their homes throughout this unrest.

The added „Mete“ – meaning „to interfere“ or „to meddle“ integrates another dimension – intervention to end the suffering of Timorese under Indonesian occupation was advocated for by many during that time. Today, however, foreign intervention has become highly contested.


COLOR UP
Gudrun Kramer, Husn Camp, Jordan, 2013

In 2013 a small group of Palestine refugee youth in Husn Camp, Jordan, started an initiative to paint the grey houses in the camp in different colours. They called the initiative “Color Up!” and came up with their “signature” on the wall. They could convince the authorities to agree to the initiative and within 24 months 1.811 houses and 10 staircases were painted. By this initiative not only the camp was beautified, but also the refugees became proud of their camp and social cohesion among them was strengthened.


EVERYTHING WILL BE OK
Sara Moschini, Pescia, Italy 2020

When Covid-19 hit Italy at the beginning of 2020, many words and drawings began to appear at windows and fences. All of them carried the same simple and powerful words "Everything will be ok" (Andrà tutto bene). It was a wonderful thing to see as we were going through the lockdown and many people were dying and/or feeling alone and scared. I bumped into one of these messages on my way to work and it was hung next to the Italian flag. It carries extra meaning as the house is a few steps away from the town hospital and could be seen from the hospital windows.


PEACE WALLS
Julia Scharinger, Dili, Timor-Leste, 2011

This mural was created in 2006/7 as part of a campaign for peace to respond to the civil unrest of that time and strenghten the sense of unity amongst the Timorese population.


WHERE DOES THE PEACE GO?
Julia Scharinger, Dili, Timor-Leste, 2011

This is one of my favourite pictures I took in Timor-Leste. It feels like a powerful metaphor to the country’s striving towards peace and shows how hard it can be to keep taking care of peace. It reminds me that peace is an action, not a noun. And even though it may be hard at times, to live through the opposite of peace is or would be much harder.
This mural was created in 2006/7 as part of a campaign for peace to respond to the civil unrest of that time and strenghten the sense of unity amongst the Timorese population.


STOP RACISM
Julia Scharinger, Dili, Timor-Leste, 2011

This mural was created in 2006/7 as part of a campaign for peace to respond to the civil unrest of that time and strenghten the sense of unity amongst the Timorese population. The civil unrest’s legacy can be traced back to the division of the Eastern and Western part of Timor-Leste that was created amidst Timor’s experience of Portuguese colonisation and Indonesian occupation.


LIVE LOVE BEIRUT
Gudrun Kramer, Beirut, Lebanon, 2015

Live Love Beirut was created in 2012 as a social impact implementation agency, with the aim to create hope through positive storytelling on social media, and making Lebanon better: Further Informations 
Since then the “Live Love Beirut” sign can be found on many walls in Beirut, spreading hope and love across the different segments of society. Especially after the horrendous explosion in August 2020 the message got a new dimension and is more important than ever.


NO CONDITION IS PERMANENT
Jan Pospisil, Yei, South Sudan, February 2020

“No condition is permanent” is a slogan often found on buses or matatus in various parts of Sub-Saharan Africa. When writing it on a wall in war-torn Yei, the saying gets a very serious meaning. As bad as the situation might become, there is always a tomorrow. And it will be different. The war will disappear, eventually.


NO WAR IN IRAN
Gudrun Kramer, Cambridge, USA, 2020

This graffiti has been found in a small backroad close to the campus of Harvard University in Cambridge, USA. It is a clear message that also many US citizens hope for a de-escalation in the US-Iran relations, and for constructive conflict transformation and dialogue. The message deserves to be taken out of this backroad and to be more visible.


DILI CIDADE DA PAZ - DILI, CITY OF PEACE
Julia Scharinger, Dili, Timor-Leste, 2011

This mural was created in 2006/7 as part of a campaign for peace to respond to the civil unrest of that time and strenghten the sense of unity amongst the Timorese population.

This mural was created by Sanggar Cultura.


HUN IDA ABUT IDA - ONE ROOT, ONE TREE
Julia Scharinger, Dili, Timor-Leste, 2011

This mural was created in 2006/7 as part of a campaign for peace to respond to the civil unrest of that time and strenghten the sense of unity amongst the Timorese population. „Hun ida abut ida hamutuk mai ita halao desenvolve domin dame no paz“ translates into „One root, one tree. Together let’s nurture love and peace“. The civil unrest’s legacy can be traced to the division that was created amidst Timor’s experience of Portuguese colonisation and Indonesian occupation.


DAME - PEACE
Julia Scharinger, Dili, Timor-Leste, 2011

This mural was created in 2006/7 as part of a campaign for peace to respond to the civil unrest of that time and strenghten the sense of unity amongst the Timorese population. „Dame“ translates into „Peace“. However, „GNX“ may have been used by a local gang marking their territory. To this day gang violence continues to be a major source for violence in the country. As such I find it a great metaphor to remind me how fragile and contested peace – and violence – can be.


TEMPU ATU HARI DAME - TIME TO CREATE PEACE
Julia Scharinger, Dili, Timor-Leste, 2011

This mural was created in 2006/7 as part of a campaign for peace to respond to the civil unrest of that time and strenghten the sense of unity amongst the Timorese population. "Tempu atu hari dame" translates into "Time to create Peace" – a sentiment echoed by many.


LOVE IS OUR RESISTANCE
Gudrun Kramer, Beirut, Lebanon 2013

When I first visited Beirut and walked through the streets, that still told the stories of decades of civil war, this graffiti reminded me of a plant pertinaciously breaking through asphalt: I was surprised to find this message in this war-torn place. Love nourishes our souls and hearts even in the darkest times and is an infinite source of power.


WHEN THE SILENCE GETS OLD
Anisa Goshi, Amman, Jordan 2020


PEACE
Julia Scharinger, Dili, Timor-Leste, 2011

This piece was created in 2006/7 as part of a campaign for peace to respond to the civil unrest of that time and strenghten the sense of unity amongst the Timorese population. During my visit in 2011 it was also the home of families who had lost their homes throughout this unrest.


HANDS WITH MASK
Anrike Visser, Bahan Township, Yangon, Myanmar 2020

The artist of this mural, Arker Kyaw (1993), is a well-known artist with exhibitions in Hong Kong, the Netherlands, Thailand, and Indonesia. He is also part of the Myanmar graffiti movement. His 'hands' are popping up all over Yangon, but the hands with mask is by far my favourite in these tyring times. 


NO GUNS
Julia Scharinger, Dili, Timor-Leste, 2011

Walking through Dili in 2011 there were quite a few murals denouncing the use of weapons in the area. Sometimes such signs could be found on NGO's offices, other times when one would enter a community. To me it always served as a powerful reminder that, even amidst a place that seemed flooded with violence and weapons at times, there were also people resisting the use of force and publicly showing their commitment for their communities to be without weapons.